The Masters chair

We have a secret: we only buy the best for our villas! As the fabulous Masters Chair – the ingenious design by Philippe Starck.

Masters chair

Comfortable, generous and welcoming with its interweaving shapes these chairs would fit to any taste.

The Masters chair by Philippe Starck at Samui Turquoise Villas
The Masters chairs at Villa#1

The Masters chair is a powerful tribute to three symbolic chairs from mid-century design masters, re-read and re-interpreted by the creative genius of Starck. The unmistakable silhouettes of the “Series 7” by Arne Jacobsen, the “Tulip Armchair” by Eero Saarinen and the “Eiffel Chair” by Charles Eames are interwoven into a sinuous hybrid giving life to a fusion of original and engaging styles.

Lightweight and durable, the Masters Chair has a wide, roomy seat, while the back rest allows you to feel supported on a historic level as it echoes the lines of the very first ergonomic innovators. The iconoclastic Starck has been working with Kartell since the 1980s, mixing the company’s desire to develop eco-friendly, contemporary plastic furniture with the designer’s unmistakably edgy and innovative style.

The Masters chair by Philippe Starck at Samui Turquoise Villas
Masters chairs at Villa#2

The Masters chair was honored with the prestigious “2010 Good Design Award” presented by the Chicago Athenaeum – Museum of Architecture and Design and the 2013 Red Dot Design Award

 

Philippe Starck

Philippe Starck (born January 18, 1949) is a French designer known since the start of his career in the 1980s for his interior, product, industrial and architectural design including furniture and objects that have simple but inventive structures.

 

Philippe Starck jump-started his career by designing two nightclub interiors in Paris in the 1970s. The success of the clubs won the attention of then-President François Mitterrand, who asked Starck to refurbish one of the private apartments in the Élysée Palace.

Two years later, Starck designed the interior of the Café Costes in Paris and was on his way to becoming a design celebrity. In quick succession, he created elegant interiors for the Royalton and Paramount hotels in New York, the Delano in Miami and the Mondrian in Los Angeles. He also began to produce chairs, lamps, motorbikes, boats and a line of housewares and kitchen utensils, like his Juicy Salif for Alessi.

During the 1980s and ’90s Starck continued his prolific creativity. His products have sensual, appealing forms suggestive of character or personal identity, and Starck often conferred upon them clever, poetic or whimsical names (for example, his Rosy Angelis Lamp, the La Marie Chair and playful Prince Aha Stool). Starck’s furniture also often reworks earlier decorative styles. For example, the elegant Dr. No Chair is a traditional club chair made unexpectedly of injection-molded plastic. While the material and form would seem to be contradictions, it is just such paradoxes that make Starck’s work so compelling.

Starck’s approach to design is subversive, intelligent and always interesting. His objects surprise and delight even as they transgress boundaries and subvert expectations. During the ’90s Starck also began to promote product longevity and stipulate that morality,  honesty, and objectivity become part of the design process. He has said that the designer’s role is to create more “happiness” with less. One can almost hear echoes of Charles and Ray Eames, who “wanted to make the world a better place.”

For all his fame and fashionableness, Starck’s work remains a serious and important expression of 20th-century creativity.

 

“Subversive, ethical, ecological, political, humorous… this is how I see my duty as a designer.”

– Philippe Starck

 

A career rich with 10,000 creations – completed or yet to come – global fame and tireless protean inventiveness should never overshadow the essential, Philippe Starck has a mission, a vision: that creation, whatever form it takes, must improve the lives of as many people as possible. Starck vehemently believes this poetic and political, rebellious and benevolent, pragmatic and subversive duty should be shared by everyone. He sums it up with the humor that’s set him apart from the very beginning:

 

“No one has to be a genius, but everyone has to participate.”

– Philippe Starck

 

 

More about Philippe Starck: www.starck.com